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Deasy ponders a future that might include politics

Vanessa Romo | October 17, 2014



Former LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa with Superintendent John Deasy in 2011

Former LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa with Supt. John Deasy in 2011

On the day after he stepped down as LA Unified Superintendent, John Deasy offered a glimpse of what may be next for him, and apparently the options include politics.

“I’m not going to speak about them specifically but I would give you the general topics,” Deasy told a group of reporters on a telephone press call hosted by Students Matter, the organization behind the Vergara lawsuit.

“One would be youth corrections,” he said. “Another would be working and supporting the development of superintendents, and the third would be a consideration for political office.”

While he did not elaborate on what kind of office or where that office might be, he said he planned to sleep in this weekend and take some time to think about his future.

“I’ll try to conclude my thinking on the next way to serve, probably by the holidays,” he said.

For the most part he seemed self-aware that his management style — one often called “autocratic” by detractors — made it impossible to continue working with the board and the teachers union, UTLA.

And he even apologized for that, in a humble-but-proud sort of way.

“I take complete responsibility for the consequence of my leadership style,” he said. “In both results and in my failing to have been able to modify or adopt a style as boards change. And I wish I could have found a better balance between my feeling of urgency in my observation of overwhelming peril and poverty for kids and the ability to have built a more unified will to move quickly to do that. And I was not successful at that piece.”

He added that people who “choose leaders that will produce good feelings and an era of no troubled waters” are essentially fearful of the consequences that come with “courageous public acts.”

Deasy also suggested that “labor” has been behind the removal of superintendents in the nation’s three three largest school districts  – New York City, LA Unified and Chicago Public Schools.

But when asked what roles iPads and his mission to get one in the hands of every student and the meltdown of a new districtwide student data system played in his separation from the district, he denied any connection.

“None,” he said.

Toward the end of the call Deasy was asked, “Isn’t part of the problem here that [reformers] have failed to convince voters in Los Angeles that your ideas are correct?”

“I don’t know how to answer that. I don’t run for office,” Deasy responded.

To which the reporter replied, “Yet.”

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