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LAUSD board getting full MiSiS report in a closed meeting

Vanessa Romo | November 5, 2014



MiSiSAfter weeks of review, investigation and analysis, the LA Unified school board tomorrow will start getting answers to questions about what went wrong with MiSiS and a long-term plan for fixing it.

A report prepared by independent consultant, Arnold Viramontes, is expected to be thoroughly discussed during the closed board meeting with Superintendent Ramon Cortines.

“At that time, we will go through it, see what [Viramontes] suggests, and I’ll share with the board the rest of my plans [for MiSiS],” Cortines told LA School Report earlier this week. “But I have to discuss it with them first.”

The report will be available to the public immediately following the meeting, Cortines said, adding “I’m all about transparency.”

Also on the agenda is Cortines’ first evaluation by the board. In his first two weeks, the three-time superintendent has not hesitated shaking things up; he has totally revamped the MiSiS leadership team, hiring and firing people once perceived as integral to the development of the system.

The board will also take up a review of the district’s Inspector General, Ken Bramlett. Bramlett’s office has been under mounting pressure to churn out more investigative reports than ever before with no additional support or resources. He recently requested a departmental budget increase.

In addition to demands for a new investigation into the iPad emails, Bramlett’s office has been asked to launch an investigation into the MiSiS rollout, which is expected to be released “very soon” according to Cortines. 

Unrelated to the board meeting, the district’s labor team will also meet tomorrow with the teachers union, UTLA, for another bargaining session. It’s unclear what specific issues will be discussed — UTLA declined to comment — but it’s possible that class size will be among the talking points.

Late last week Chief Labor Negotiator, Vivian Ekchian, issued a memo to Cortines and Chief Deputy Superintendent Michelle King, explaining a variety of factors impacting class size, apparently in response to a union request for more information.

Smaller class size is one issue within the package of demands UTLA has taken into negotiations this year. It’s unclear, however, if union leaders have made any progress on any of them.

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