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Morning Read: In Case You Missed it, Deasy is Staying

LA School Report | October 30, 2013



LAUSD head John Deasy to stay through 2016
After a 4½ hour closed session, the Los Angeles Unified board gave Superintendent John Deasy a “satisfactory” performance evaluation on Tuesday and extended his $330,000-a-year contract for another year. LA Daily News


Deasy stays at L.A. Unified. Now what?
Commentary: United Teachers Los Angeles will no doubt disagree with this statement, but when did that ever stop us? It’s very good news that John Deasy will be staying on as superintendent — and that this isn’t just for today or the next few months, but that his contract has been extended to 2016. LA Times


Feds set price of defiance on standardized tests: at least $15 million
The state now knows how much federal funding it stands to lose by declining to give state standardized tests in math and English language arts next spring to all students: at least $15 million – and potentially tens of millions of dollars more. EdSource


Study: new teachers more educated, of higher caliber
Teaching may be attracting a more academically successful group of people compared to previous years. Two researchers at the University of Washington examined four national data sets to determine how the characteristics of first-year teachers changed between 1993 and 2010. Hechinger Report


Boost in charter school enrollment expected under Brown’s school formula
New charters opened only a year ago might be disadvantaged by as much as $1,500 per student compared to one established under the new Local Control Funding Formula even though both might serve a similar student population, according to analysis from the California Charter Schools Association. SI&A Cabinet Report


Tech assistance in testing poses practical issues
On-screen calculators. Magnified print. Text-to-speech readers. Closed captioning and American Sign Language interpretation. All of those modes of accessing test questions and providing answers will be built into the tests linked to the Common Core State Standards now being implemented by all but four states, in an effort to make sure the tests hew closely to the precepts of “universal design” for learning. EdWeek


A prime time for learning
Commentary: Luke Farris, a fifth-grader, says he never would have made it on the Straight-A Honor Roll without his after-school program, adding that it “gives children who don’t have computers at home extra time” to learn in the afternoons. Politico 


Out of foster care, into college
By definition, foster children have been delinquent, abandoned, neglected, physically, sexually and/or emotionally abused, and that does not take into account nonstatutory abuses like heartache. About two-thirds never go to college and very few graduate, so it’s a safe bet that those who do have an uncommon resilience. New York Times

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