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Morning Read: Toward what end is ‘parent trigger’ moving?

LA School Report | June 24, 2014



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Parent-trigger efforts: At a crossroads? A standstill? A dead end?
Parent-trigger campaigns have spurred changes at six schools in southern California, only one of which involved a full charter school conversion. Every successful parent union had the backing of the Los Angeles-based Parent Revolution, the nonprofit group formed to promote the law, teach parents how to organize into unions and fund their petition campaigns. Hechinger Report


Arts access at LA elementary schools, by the numbers
Ahead of Tuesday’s meeting of the school board’s curriculum committee, Los Angeles Unified administrators have released a new document detailing proposed arts access for its 270,000 elementary students next year. The extensive spreadsheet is the most comprehensive view yet of arts instruction for the 2014-15 school year, the second school year under L.A Unified’s new arts plan. KPCC


Jared Polis: Antiquated laws in education
Commentary: As elected officials, we are tasked with protecting the general welfare, importantly a large part of which is ensuring that our children and generations to come have access to high quality educational opportunities that prepare them to succeed in a modern economy. Unfortunately, antiquated and counterproductive state laws stand in the way of equity and opportunity for our nation’s children. OC Register


Pediatrics Group to Recommend Reading Aloud to Children From Birth
In between dispensing advice on breast-feeding and immunizations, doctors will tell parents to read aloud to their infants from birth, under a new policy that the American Academy of Pediatrics will announce on Tuesday. research shows that many parents do not read to their children as often as researchers and educators think is crucial to the development of pre-literacy skills that help children succeed once they get to school. NY Times

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