In Partnership with 74

Morning Read: News on graduation rates and fidgety boys

LA School Report | April 29, 2014



Support LA School Report's year-end campaign. All donations will be matched dollar for dollar.

California graduation rate rises, but achievement gap remains
Commentary: Let’s assume, at least for discussion, that maximizing high school graduation rates is – or should be – the primary goal of any public school system. A corollary assumption, of course, is that a system’s diploma is meaningful, that it indicates the graduate is prepared to enter the workforce or seek post-high-school education. Sacramento Bee


California’s high school graduation rate passes 80% for first time
For the first time in California history, the high school graduation rate has surpassed 80%, mirroring a trend nationwide, officials announced Monday. Although disparities remain based on students’ race, socioeconomic status and English skills, the graduation rates for Latino and African American students are increasing more rapidly than those of their white and Asian peers. Los Angeles Times


Graduation rate hits new high in California
The graduation rate in California inched above 80 percent last year, the highest level in state history, officials announced Monday. But the numbers were tempered somewhat by a new report that suggests the national graduation rate might stagnate if California does not continue to make significant progress. EdSource


A link between fidgety boys and a sputtering economy
The behavior gap between rich and poor children, starting at very early ages, is now a well-known piece of social science. Entering kindergarten, high-income children not only know more words and can read better than poorer children but they also have longer attention spans, better-controlled tempers and more sensitivity to other children.All of which makes the comparisons between boys and girls in the same categories fairly striking: The gap in behavioral skills between young girls and boys is even bigger than the gap between rich and poor. The New York Times

Read Next